Program
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Program

2019 Annual Meeting Preliminary Program

 

Highlights

Invited Speakers

Thursday, September 26, 2019
1:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m.
Can We Improve Brain Mechanisms of Emotion Regulation By Increasing Heart Rate Variability?

 Mara Mather
Professor of Gerontology and Psychology, University of Southern California

 

Friday, September 27, 2019
10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m.
The Visual Prefrontal Cortex of Primates: Availability, Desirability and Arousal

Elizabeth A. (Betsy) Murray
Chief, Section on the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, Chief, Laboratory of Neuropsychology, National Institute of Mental Health

 

Saturday, September 28, 2019
10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m.
fMRI-based Models of Affective Experience: Computation, Representation, and Brain-Body Communication
Tor D. Wager
Department of Psychology and Neuroscience and the Institute for Cognitive Science, University of Colorado, Boulder

 

Presidential Address

Saturday, September 28, 2019
11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Presidential Address
Who to Whom and Why - The Social Nature of Facial Mimicry of Emotions

Ursula Hess
Professor of Psychology, Humboldt- University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany

 

Special Symposium in Honor of Manny Donchin

Saturday, September 28, 2019
3:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m.
Special Symposium in Honor of Manny Donchin

“Our Fearless Leader”: Manny’s Roles as a Scientist, Department Head and Mentor
     •
Things You May Not Know About Manny, and Were Afraid to Ask
     •
Manny Donchin as a Leader
     •
The Transformative Impact of Manny's Carmel Conferences
     •
A Champaign Toast to Manny Donchin
     •
Memes, Mirth, and Manny
     •
A Transformative Experience: My Years at the CPL (1979-1982)

"ERPs as a Window into the Mind”: Theoretical and Methodological Contributions
     
P300 From the Perspective of Brain Networks
     •
ERPs, Mental Chronometry, and Strategic Control
     •
The Importance of Individual Differences in Cognitive Psychophysiology
     •
The Concept of the ERP Component in Cognitive Neuroscience
     •
ERN!...ERN?
     •
How Sweet it is:  A Double-Blind Placebo-Control Assessment of the Role Glucose Plays in         the Regulation of Errant Behavior
     •
ERP Correlates of Feedback-based Learning in Children with Typical                                           and Atypical Language Development
     •
Individual Differences in Error Processing are Reflected in EEG Activity During Motor                Adaptation

“The Talking Brain”: Applications of ERPs to Human Factors, the Guilty Knowledge Paradigm and Brain-computer Interfacing (BCI)
     
Beyond Human Factors:  The Psychophysiology of Lifestyle
     •
How Manny's Lab Got Me Off Opiates (Research) and into P300-based Concealed                       Information Tests
     •
From the P300 Event-related Potential to the P300-based Brain-computer Interface

Closing Remarks
     
Emanuel Donchin: Final Words -- Prose and Poetry 

 

Early Career Award Addresses

Friday, September 27, 2019
4:45 p.m.-5:15 p.m.
Early Career Award Address
NEUROVISCERAL REGULATORY CIRCUITS OF AFFECTIVE RESILIENCE IN YOUTH
Julian Koenig
Heidelberg University

The vast majority of mental disorders have their onset during adolescence. The development of mental health problems during adolescence is rooted in a complex interplay of social, psychological, and neurobiological factors, all of which undergo extensive change during the sensitive period of maturation. Teenagers face multiple challenges, taxing their capacity to regulate stress and emotions. While the majority of adolescents show considerable resilience in the transition from adolescence to young adulthood, some continue to develop severe psychopathology. The neurobiological mechanisms of ‘affective resilience’ in those recovering from episodes of increased emotional distress are not well understood. Prefrontal brain areas show delayed maturation in contrast to limbic regions, contributing to greater affective instability during adolescence. Evidence on the mechanisms underlying inter-individual differences in these trajectories is scarce. The development of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) has largely been neglected. The ANS is of utmost importance in regulating stress-related autonomic arousal and affect and has been shown to be associated with both prefrontal and limbic brain regions on a structural and function level. Dysplasia of central-autonomic co-regulation represents a potential predisposing factor contributing to sustained difficulties in regulating emotions and promoting chronification of psychopathology. Studying the co-development of the brain and the ANS in adolescent emotion regulation and mental health, promises new insights into affective resiliency.

 

5:15 p.m.-5:45 p.m.
Early Career Award Address
A MULTIMODAL APPROACH TO EMOTIONAL PROCESSING AND REGULATION IN DEPRESSION
Lauren M. Bylsma
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

Major depressive disorder is characterized by deficits in emotional processing, reactivity, and regulation, although depressed individuals vary considerably in the extent to which they exhibit specific alterations. Some of these alterations may persist after a depressive episode is remitted and can also be apparent in youth at elevated risk for depression prior to the initial onset of a depressive disorder. Emotion is a complex, multi-component process that involves coordination across multiple levels, including subjective experience, behavior, autonomic regulation, and neural processing. This talk will review the current state of the literature on emotional functioning and depression, with a focus on the importance of assessing emotional indices from multiple levels of analysis both in the laboratory and in daily life across development. Emphasis will be given on how psychophysiological measures can help elucidate emotional processes that underlie the pathophysiology of depression. Developmental considerations and clinical implications will also be discussed. 
 

Questions?  Send an email to meetings@sprweb.org.


 

 

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